Newsletter

August 1, 2018

#1 Collector Favorite Limited Edition titled Mountain Outlaw Shooting grizzly bears Mangelsen Style, through a camera lens.
 

A Wildlife Photographer Won a Permit to Shoot Grizzlies.
Here’s What He’s Doing with It.

THE WASHINGTON POST by Karin Brulliard


The largest grizzly hunt in the Lower 48 in more than 40 years is set to open next month in Wyoming, and more than 7,000 people applied for a chance to kill one of up to 22 bears. Among the tiny number of people who won the draw for permits is a wildlife photographer who has produced some of the most famous images of the area’s grizzlies.

Thomas D. Mangelsen, who has lived near Grand Teton National Park for four decades, said in an interview this week that he will use the permit to shoot bears as he’s always done — with a camera, not a gun.

Mangelsen’s luck in the lottery followed a campaign spearheaded by local hunt opponents to encourage like-minded people to apply for permits in hopes of preventing the death of at least one member of the Yellowstone area’s grizzly population, which was removed from the endangered species list in 2017. Amid a hugely contentious debate over the hunt, their tactic is being hailed by some as a heroic protest and scorned by others as starry-eyed thievery of an opportunity that hunters deserve.

“Well, what other way are we going to do it?” said Mangelsen...
Read the entire article from The Washington Post.

Take Action NOW!

You Collect. We Donate.

Partner with us and we will give back, to fight for our natural world and its wildlife. *When you purchase a Mangelsen fine art photograph or sculpture, Tom will donate 20% of the sale to trusted organizations who help protect grizzly bears, mountain lions and our great wild places! To get started browse The Art or view the entire Grizzly 399 collection, then to activate the donation, type “GRIZZLY 399” in the notes section on your order. Cannot be combined with any other offer or promotion.

Use the code and a portion of your purchase will be donated to organizations personally selected by Tom.

the Jane Goodall Institute
Make a donation to the Jane Goodall Institute at:

janegoodall.org

With your support, JGI can protect wildlife, conserve critical habitat while strengthening surrounding communities, and empower the next generation of conservation leaders.

The Cougar Fund
Help support their important work by donating here:

The Cougar Fund
PO Box 122
Jackson, WY 83001
(307) 733-0797
cougarfund.org

EarthJustice
Join the legal fight, contribute:

EarthJustice
313 E. Main St.
Bozeman, MT 59715
earthjustice.org

Checks should note that it's for Grizzly bear legal defense. Safely make a contribution via credit card at (406) 586-9699

     
 

July 26, 2018

Mangelsen Shooting Grizzly Bears
 

Thomas D. Mangelsen is pleased that a hunting lottery in Wyoming positions him well to hold a hunting tag. Instead of toting a rifle, he'll take aim with a camera. Photo of Tom Mangelsen courtesy of 60 Minutes

PUBLISHED IN Mountain Journal

Bruin Lottery: Photographer Tom Mangelsen Scores A Wyoming Grizzly Tag

JACKSON HOLE CONSERVATIONIST PLANS TO HUNT A BEAR WITH HIS CAMERA
by Todd Wilkinson


Thomas D. Mangelsen is feeling grateful for the luck of the draw, but even he couldn't have imagined it would happen in a lottery staged to allot licenses for trophy hunting grizzly bears. If you don't yet grasp the trickster irony, then you don't know the famed American wildlife photographer who makes his home in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

One of the country’s most outspoken critics of trophy sport hunting, Mangelsen learned Thursday, July 26 that he finished high enough in Wyoming’s bear hunting sweepstakes that he might be able to legally stalk a Greater Yellowstone grizzly this fall.

Euphoric at the prospect, he relishes the chance and, if called by wildlife managers with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, he will pursue a coveted grizzly not with a gun but as he always does, with a long camera lens.

Only a week ago, Mangelsen helped ignite a new movement, hastily organized by five women in Jackson Hole called “Shoot’em With A Camera—Not A Gun.” It sought to enlist non-hunters nationwide to put in for one of Wyoming’s 22 bear hunting licenses. The intent being that if any one of them is awarded a tag to fell a grizzly they will elect not to lethally use it, thus keeping a bear alive. The hunt season lasts from Sept. 15 to Nov. 15 and essentially a non-hunter is preventing a bear from being killed during the 10 days he/she is authorized to take a grizzly.

Wyoming is recommencing a trophy hunt of grizzlies that hasn't happened for 44 years and was halted when bruins in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem were listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1975.

Back then, it is believed the grizzly population in Greater Yellowstone was just 136 individuals or fewer, with the majority of bears found inside Yellowstone National Park. In the decades since, thanks to strict regulations governing habitat protection, a prohibition on hunting, reducing conflicts with people and stiff penalties awaiting poachers, the number has climbed to around 700 in the primary bear recovery zone. Read the entire article in Mountain Journal.

 

May 17, 2018

Sport Hunting
 

Sport Hunting is Threatening the Greater Yellowstone Grizzlies


For the first time in 43 years, the state of Wyoming plans to commence a “trophy sport hunt” of Greater Yellowstone grizzly bears only a year after the popular icons of Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Park were removed from federal protection. I strongly oppose the hunt in which up to 24 grizzlies, including 14 females, could be killed as a part of Wyoming's unwise plan. Bears are worth far more to our society and future generations as remarkable living creatures than turned into rugs or having their head mounted on a wall.

Not only is Wyoming's hunt considered biologically questionable and offensive to millions of people who travel to the ecosystem from around the world to see grizzlies live, but there is the very real possibility that female bears like grizzly 399 (the most famous bear in the world and the subject of my book, Grizzlies of Pilgrim Creek), could be mistakenly killed and/or leave cubs orphaned.

If you wish to state your opposition, let Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead know that you find Wyoming's controversial hunt to be a bad reflection on his state. Please, and this is important, also send a letter to your member of Congress (and demand a response from all elected officials, including Gov. Mead). In addition, please send my support team an email copy of your letter as I, along with Jane Goodall and others, will keep up the pressure to stop the hunt.

In the meantime, if you are considering making a donation to grizzly conservation, please send your contribution to EarthJustice, which is mounting a legal court challenge to stop the hunt. Another great conservation group working to protect cougars and grizzly bears is The Cougar Fund.

Thomas D. Mangelsen signature

Take Action NOW!

EarthJustice
Join the legal fight, contribute:

EarthJustice
313 E. Main St.
Bozeman, MT 59715
earthjustice.org

Checks should note that it's for Grizzly bear legal defense. Safely make a contribution via credit card at (406) 586-9699

The Cougar Fund
Help support their important work by donating here:

The Cougar Fund
PO Box 122
Jackson, WY 83001
(307) 733-0797
cougarfund.org

Wyoming state sealSend a letter directly to Wyoming Govenor, Matt Mead:

Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead
2323 Carey Avenue
Cheyenne, WY 82001

governor.wyo.gov/contact-us

You can also write your member of congress.

     
First Light - Grizzly Bear | Limited Edition

First Light - Grizzly Bear | First light strikes the summit of Mount Moran painting the sky orange as mist rises off the Snake River. On this crisp October morning, a female grizzly wades a shallow bend in the river returning to the remains of an elk she had killed two days earlier when a bull and his harem crossed in the predawn. After catching her breath, she drug her hard-won prize out of the river and into the protection of the forest. With giant paws and long claws, the great bruin excavated large clumps of grass, roots and sticks, covering the elk and then lay atop the huge mound. From there she zealously protected it from all other predators and scavengers, swatting at the clever and persistent magpies. Her feast lasted four days and would help ensure her survival through the long, cold winter and deep snows of Grand Teton National Park.